This Week’s Discovery

Sea Bags® for J.Crew Indigo Collection tote
Some New England maritime style, courtesy of Maine-based Sea Bags. Each of their rugged carryalls is made from reclaimed sailcloth and still sports the rust and salt marks (and maybe even a stain or two) forged by a hard-sailed life at sea—so no two are ever alike. Functional details: a bi-panel construction with heavy-duty zigzag stitching, a hand-spliced rope handle—so it can hold serious weight—and an interior flap pocket with vintage hardware. A tote you’ll never be embarrassed to carry, with gale-force construction that makes getting to and from port (or the airport) a breeze.
Sea Bags’ tools of the trade: recycled sailcloth.

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This Week’s Discovery

Ray-Ban® Meteor sunglasses
Looking to update your Matrix-inspired ’90s wraparounds, complete with neoprene cord (shudder)? Introducing the Meteor, the latest under-the- radar style from sunglasses master
Ray-Ban, the brand that’s outfitted the chiseled faces of A-listers like James Dean, JFK and
Johnny Depp. This new made-in-Italy frame features vintage details like distinctive rivets
(the silver hinges in the corners) and green crystal lenses—for clearer beach days—that you
can also swap out for your own prescription lenses. Style upgrade complete.

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This Week’s Discovery

the Barbour® Short International jacket
A sartorial truth: Once the temperatures rise, your favorite jackets make their way to the back of the closet. But when the weather requires more than a T-shirt, what’s the solution? A flannel-lined or waxed cotton topper won’t cut it—trust us, we’ve tried, and we’ve poured sweat. Our men’s design team’s answer from across the pond: the lightweight Barbour. The style is a recent addition to the company’s International collection, which Barbour launched in 1936 for motorcyclists in the International Six Days Trial, the oldest off-road European motorcycle event. Lightweight, waterproof and crafted from breathable nylon, this windbreaker is ideal for chilly ferry rides, city rain showers and—most appropriately—gusty spins on the Triumph.
Top: The International Six Days Trial starting line, 1938.
Bottom: A biker midcourse (the route covers more than 400 miles).


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(photo credits: top, bottom)

This Week’s Discovery

the 484 jean
What do the men who built the Transcontinental Railroad, the Empire State Building and Fenway Park have in common? They all wore selvedge denim workwear on the job. With a nod to the past, we used 100-year-old shuttle looms to create our own small-batch, durable selvedge denim, dyed in a deep indigo that breaks in and fades differently for each person. The 484 jean was named after our first-ever men’s store in downtown NYC, marking the beginning of a new standard in denim—our slimmest fit that’s narrow through the hip, thigh and leg. According to our designers, it’s the best jean in the world to roll up and it’s tough as nails, to boot. Proving that style and substance matter, whether it’s building a country…or a wardrobe.
Broadway, New York, 1894; photographer Charles Clyde Ebbetts documenting
the workers who helped create Rockefeller Center and various skyscrapers in 1932.


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(photo credits: top, bottom)

This Week’s Discovery

the Wallace & Barnes fishtail short
New from our line of limited-edition workwear-inspired pieces: the Wallace & Barnes fishtail short. On a visit to a turn-of-the-century sawmill museum in New Hampshire, one of our men’s designers was struck by how well a 120-year-old pair of work pants on display had held up. Though battered and caked in wood dust, the workwear detailing remained intact. Even more impressive, he noted, was the ingenious fishtail constructed at the back of the waistband for comfort when wearing suspenders. Inspired, we constructed our own version in a heavy cotton-linen blend using this unique design element and giving it interior suspender buttons (hidden, in case you want to wear a belt instead) and drop-face reinforcing at the front and back. And to those who dare to rock the shorts and suspenders look, we salute you.

This Week’s Discovery

the Indigo Polo
A little style yarn to help pass the time between the French Open and Wimbledon. Meet Argentinean tennis pro Guellermo Vilas, famous in the ’70s for his left-handed topspin and signature style, comprised mostly of old-school polos. Inspired by the star, our men’s designer, Eric decided to borrow from his on-court look for our men’s collection. He started with the silhouette of our classic cotton polo, then added an extra-long placket and tennis tail hem
(meaning it’s slightly longer in the back). To finish it off, he gave the design a modern touch—razor-sharp stripes that were achieved using authentic indigo dye. Historically, the real stuff
comes from the Indigofera tinctoria, or “true indigo,” plant native to India—and is rarely used
in today’s garments. Game on.
Vilas at the U.S. Open, 1982
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This Week’s Discovery

Ebbets Field Flannels® ball cap
Seven years ago, our in-house brand expert, Jamie, was looking to replace his vintage 1950s
ball cap. After months of digging in obscure shops (and searching every corner of the Internet)
and not finding anything that lived up to his standards of authenticity, he finally stumbled on the perfect replica. Since 1987, Ebbets Field Flannels, named for the old Brooklyn Dodgers’ stadium in Flatbush, has been creating American-made caps inspired by the non–major league teams of
the 1900s to the 1950s. We’ve teamed up with them to bring you these exclusive styles in soft brushed twill and custom colors, featuring the legendary logos of the Homestead Grays, the Brooklyn Bushwicks and the Chicago American Giants. The really good news? Jamie’s hat is
still holding up nicely.
Brooklyn Dodgers players pose on opening day, April 1947.
A sketch of Ebbets Field, the Brooklyn Dodgers’ stadium that was once located in Flatbush.

This Week’s Discovery

Soludos® for J.Crew espadrilles
When it comes to summer shoes, Soludos has proven there’s life beyond flip-flops—and the name, a combination of the Spanish words sol (sun) and salud (cheers), is the perfect qualifier. When founder and designer Nick Brown moved stateside, he set out to recreate the simple, laid-back espadrilles he wore growing up—the ones sold in the markets and along the beaches of the Mediterranean: “We use authentic weaving and dyeing techniques, so they’re just like their international counterparts.” The jute-soled, eco-friendly styles have a few special twists, like three exclusive-to-us colors and fabrics. And since they’re the price of just a few cervezas, we recommend stocking up on more than one pair. Salud!

Clockwise from top left:
Founder Nick Brown shows off his espadrilles; inspiration for the Soludos for J.Crew collaboration; A Perfect Summer Day shot in Montauk, New York.

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(images courtesy of Soludos®)

This Week’s Discovery

the Billykirk® bag
Not all bags are created equal. Founded in 1999 by brothers Chris and Kirk Bray, each of Billykirk’s rugged, minimal pieces is constructed by hand in Pennsylvania—in the heart of Amish country—using master-craftsman techniques. As our men’s accessories designer Addi puts it: “The integrity and artistry is incredible—a throwback to the days when things were made with so much care and attention.” Crafted in vegetable-tanned leather from one of America’s oldest and most renowned tanneries, this satchel’s a choice work bag—large enough to hold a 15” computer and tough enough to withstand coffee spills and subway doors. In with the old, we say…
Chris and Kirk (aka the Brothers Bray) show their wares.

(image credit)

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