This Week’s Discovery

OGJM jewelry
Introducing our capsule collection of jewelry with a twist (literally). When jewelry designer Jaclyn Meyer paid a studio visit to her friend visual artist Orly Genger shortly before the opening of one of Genger’s large-scale rope installations, she spied a scrap piece on the floor and was inspired to create a necklace. Genger wore it to her opening to rave reviews and OGJM (a combination of both women’s initials) was born. With its unique mix of abstract-art influence, California bohemianism and classic nautical style, it’s no surprise that what started as a show stealer became a line of outfit makers. For our exclusive collection, the pair created a bib necklace using an abstract knotting technique (so no two are exactly alike) and a bracelet crafted from climbing rope. Wearable works of art that cost less than a MoMA membership? How fabulous.
Orly Genger’s Big Boss, 2010, rope with latex paint (installed at MASS MoCA, North Adams, MA); Orly Genger’s Puzzlejuice, 2006, nylon rope with latex paint (installed in Riverside Park, New York, NY). 

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(photo credits: top, bottom)

This Week’s Discovery

Ray-Ban® Meteor sunglasses
Looking to update your Matrix-inspired ’90s wraparounds, complete with neoprene cord (shudder)? Introducing the Meteor, the latest under-the- radar style from sunglasses master
Ray-Ban, the brand that’s outfitted the chiseled faces of A-listers like James Dean, JFK and
Johnny Depp. This new made-in-Italy frame features vintage details like distinctive rivets
(the silver hinges in the corners) and green crystal lenses—for clearer beach days—that you
can also swap out for your own prescription lenses. Style upgrade complete.

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This Week’s Discovery

the Barbour® Short International jacket
A sartorial truth: Once the temperatures rise, your favorite jackets make their way to the back of the closet. But when the weather requires more than a T-shirt, what’s the solution? A flannel-lined or waxed cotton topper won’t cut it—trust us, we’ve tried, and we’ve poured sweat. Our men’s design team’s answer from across the pond: the lightweight Barbour. The style is a recent addition to the company’s International collection, which Barbour launched in 1936 for motorcyclists in the International Six Days Trial, the oldest off-road European motorcycle event. Lightweight, waterproof and crafted from breathable nylon, this windbreaker is ideal for chilly ferry rides, city rain showers and—most appropriately—gusty spins on the Triumph.
Top: The International Six Days Trial starting line, 1938.
Bottom: A biker midcourse (the route covers more than 400 miles).


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(photo credits: top, bottom)

This Week’s Discovery

Superga® sneakers
Turin, Italy: the birthplace of Superga. For over a century, this brand has been making classic
and colorful shoes for the most discerning European women. This particular style was first
created in 1925, and not a single stitch has changed since. Every component is still put together
by hand, then baked (yes, baked) at a very high temperature to create an incredibly durable seal that lasts for years. What has evolved? The prints, colors and materials, which the Superga
design team updates each season based on artful inspiration and top trends. Finally, a stylish
solve for touring the palazzo.

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This Week’s Discovery

the café capri in kaleidoscope dot
“No one cares about prints and colors quite like the Italians do,” says Creative Director Jenna Lyons. On a trip last year to Ratti, the nearly 70-year-old print house in Lake Como, Italy, she discovered this artful polka-dot print inside the Ratti collection books. The story behind what caught her eye? This geometric motif was hand painted by Ratti’s skilled in-house artisans, who were inspired by a mix of mosaic tiles and ’60s Pop Art. And it rounds out our summer wardrobe with a punch.
Some photos from our design team’s visit to Ratti last year.

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This Week’s Discovery

the 484 jean
What do the men who built the Transcontinental Railroad, the Empire State Building and Fenway Park have in common? They all wore selvedge denim workwear on the job. With a nod to the past, we used 100-year-old shuttle looms to create our own small-batch, durable selvedge denim, dyed in a deep indigo that breaks in and fades differently for each person. The 484 jean was named after our first-ever men’s store in downtown NYC, marking the beginning of a new standard in denim—our slimmest fit that’s narrow through the hip, thigh and leg. According to our designers, it’s the best jean in the world to roll up and it’s tough as nails, to boot. Proving that style and substance matter, whether it’s building a country…or a wardrobe.
Broadway, New York, 1894; photographer Charles Clyde Ebbetts documenting
the workers who helped create Rockefeller Center and various skyscrapers in 1932.


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(photo credits: top, bottom)

This Week’s Discovery

the Wallace & Barnes fishtail short
New from our line of limited-edition workwear-inspired pieces: the Wallace & Barnes fishtail short. On a visit to a turn-of-the-century sawmill museum in New Hampshire, one of our men’s designers was struck by how well a 120-year-old pair of work pants on display had held up. Though battered and caked in wood dust, the workwear detailing remained intact. Even more impressive, he noted, was the ingenious fishtail constructed at the back of the waistband for comfort when wearing suspenders. Inspired, we constructed our own version in a heavy cotton-linen blend using this unique design element and giving it interior suspender buttons (hidden, in case you want to wear a belt instead) and drop-face reinforcing at the front and back. And to those who dare to rock the shorts and suspenders look, we salute you.

This Week’s Discovery

the Edie wallet
Metro cards. Your gym pass. A stash of stamps. Starbucks gold card. How ever to organize it
all—and in style, no less? Meet the most recent—and most adorable—addition to our ladylike
Edie handbag collection. A polished rectangular shape in sleek leather or calf hair, plus a slew
of interior pockets, a zipper for coins (foreign or domestic) and our signature turnlock. Exceptionally functional and exceptionally good-looking—we’ll take it.

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This Week’s Discovery

the Indigo Polo
A little style yarn to help pass the time between the French Open and Wimbledon. Meet Argentinean tennis pro Guellermo Vilas, famous in the ’70s for his left-handed topspin and signature style, comprised mostly of old-school polos. Inspired by the star, our men’s designer, Eric decided to borrow from his on-court look for our men’s collection. He started with the silhouette of our classic cotton polo, then added an extra-long placket and tennis tail hem
(meaning it’s slightly longer in the back). To finish it off, he gave the design a modern touch—razor-sharp stripes that were achieved using authentic indigo dye. Historically, the real stuff
comes from the Indigofera tinctoria, or “true indigo,” plant native to India—and is rarely used
in today’s garments. Game on.
Vilas at the U.S. Open, 1982
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This Week’s Discovery

the Panama hat
We’re bringing a little south-of-the-equator style to our summer wardrobe, all in the name of showing support for fair-trade fashion. First made famous by Teddy Roosevelt on a visit to the Panama Canal in 1906, the black-banded classic has since become the go-to topper for stylish personalities from Lauren Hutton to Kate Moss. Woven entirely by hand in Ecuador from toquilla palm fronds (so no two are ever exactly alike), it’s a surprisingly sexy borrowed-from-the-boys extra that’s the perfect add-on for sultry summer nights. Not to mention, your dermatologist will
be thrilled by its sun-shielding capabilities.

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© 2014 by J.Crew. All Images and materials are copyrighted by J.Crew unless otherwise noted.

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